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Ray Eaton

Ray Eaton is a native Kentuckian and lives near Berea, KY. After earning a B.S. degree in Environmental Studies from Eastern Kentucky University, he started his environmental consulting career in 2009 as an environmental scientist. He gained a few years of experience working on a wide variety of natural resource conservation issues before deciding on the specialty of bat ecology. Since then, bat research has led him to 16 states and tribal lands. He stays up-to-date with bats by regularly attending research symposiums and reading peer-reviewed publications. In addition to professional consulting, he volunteers his time with educational demonstrations and contributes to organized efforts to gather bat population data, with the hope that we can better monitor and understand the impact a deadly fungus is having on America’s bats.

Ray’s skill-set includes designing and implementing study-plans for bat research. He has an understanding of the habitat requirements of all bat species living in the eastern US and can assess habitat suitability for listed and non-listed bats. Research-techniques that he is experienced with include: mist-netting, cave census using photography, IR and thermal video recording, ultra-sonic acoustic recording and analysis, and harp-trapping portals. He has a strong understanding of radio-telemetry, and thrives to gather new data on foraging, migration, and roosting. He is adept with GIS and home-range analysis.

Ray also has years of experience working with streams and wetlands, and regularly attends professional training on the subjects of soils and plants. He has planted thousands of trees and shrubs, delineated countless wetlands, and classified miles of streams and really enjoy getting his boots muddy in restoration work and site monitoring.
He started working with Copperhead Consulting in the fall of 2017 as a part time employee. We now want to welcome him as an official fulltime employee!

Outside of work, Ray enjoys fishing, exploring natural areas, and seeing live music.

Ray Eaton

Biologist